In-Depth Feature

How The Women's World Cup Works: A Guide For Everyone

In many ways, the Women’s World Cup is a lot like its male counterpart. In many ways, it isn’t. So with the tournament set to arrive this summer in France, we thought we’d explain how the Women's World Cup works in 2019.

The men’s World Cup has been around since 1930, but the women’s World Cup didn’t start until 1991. The men’s World Cup has 32 teams, the women’s just 24. The U.S. sucks at the men’s World Cup; the U.S. dominates at the Women’s World Cup.

Winners and Losers From The First Week Of Premier League Play

With the Premier League kicking off this past weekend, soccer is almost back in full form around the world. As some top clubs had unreal losses, others shocked us with a win. There were numerous winners and losers from the first week of action back in the Premier League. 

Land Of The Midnight Sun: The Story Behind The Golden Age Of Women’s Football In Sweden

If you had to name the current Galácticos of women's club football, the answer is pretty easy: Olympique Lyon. The French side won a record 14 consecutive Ligue 1 titles and five Champions League titles in a row before both streaks were ended by PSG this year. 

But 20 years ago, there was an unexpected forerunner in women's soccer, a team full of Galácticos that spawned at a time when the original Galácticos side at Real Madrid was still in its infancy.

A Brief History On Why People Hate The USWNT

In 1999, the USWNT was on top of the world. Americans fell in love with the 99ers who won the Women’s World Cup on home soil, with Brandi Chastain’s shirtless celebration becoming one of the first soccer moments to transcend into mainstream culture in the U.S. 

Twenty years later, the USWNT was back on top of the world. Megan Rapinoe led the USWNT to a fourth Women’s World Cup, but the love didn’t necessarily follow. Half of the country hated the team for reasons having little to do with soccer.

Soccer Trading Cards 101: How To Start Your Collection And Make Money

Collecting cards can be one of the most intriguing hobbies on offer for hardcore sports fans. The market for soccer cards has exploded since 2020, and it's projected to rise over the coming years. With the hobby growing fast, now is a good time to start your own soccer card collection. 

The Best Summer Transfers: These 6 Clubs Have Our Attention

Come August, there are always a few clubs that capture the imagination with their audacious summer spending before inevitably collapsing by October. Usually this is Everton. 

The return of a club legend, the signing of a highly touted prodigy or a loan move for a big-name player whose career has stalled (or preferably all three in one window) are the usual fixings for getting way too hyped before the start of a new campaign.  

Remembering When Pelé Played For The USMNT And They Still Sucked

The U.S. will host the men’s World Cup for a second time in 2026, which will coincide with the nation’s 250th anniversary. It won’t be the first major birthday the U.S. has celebrated with a soccer tournament, though the USMNT won’t have had fond memories from the first. Not even Pelé was able to save the U.S. at the Bicentennial Cup. 

USMNT Advances To Gold Cup Semis After Matthew Hoppe Refuses To Be Denied

A beautifully chaotic Gold Cup quarterfinal between the USMNT and Jamaica produced a dramatic winner on Sunday night in Arlington after 20-year-old forward Matthew Hoppe earned the Americans’ passage to the semis with a header in the 83rd minute.   

With an average age of 23 and average cap collection of just 12, there was a question of nerves — especially after a large crowd at AT&T Stadium had belted out "The Star-Spangled Banner" to animate the enormity of the occasion. 

USMNT Uses Fastest Goal In Program History To Beat Canada, Win Group B

Gianluca Busio stood in the center circle at Children's Mercy Park on Sunday afternoon, awaiting the whistle to kick-off the USMNT’s Gold Cup group finale against Canada. 

When it sounded, the 19-year-old moved the ball to James Sands on the backline. The defender launched it forward at Sam Vines, who initiated a bit of head tennis that allowed the U.S. to suddenly overwhelm the left-hand side numerically.

Pages